premature optimization IS BAD

Product development is very challenging for various reasons. I personally feel that premature optimization is bad. This directly contradicts the tenets of MVP. When we are developing a product, we should aim to skip couple of generations and think beyond (dream big) .

I decided to write this blog after a recent incident that happened in our product design/development team.

I knew that we have a very good design which is built for accommodating changes. So I got the idea of virtual offices so that I can easily include the counseling and nutritionist aspects in the cancer patient care process. People started screaming at me and accused me (in a friendly way of course) of expanding the scope. In my mind, I was focused on the business value and had abandoned all other constraints.

After few design sessions, we all found out that, with very little refactoring, we could accommodate the ‘virtual office’ concept. The point of I am trying to make is, don’t unnecessarily constraint your self if you don’t have to. IMO, this is single most important virtue that differentiates startups (small companies) from big corporations. If you search for ‘corporate innovation’ on Google, you find many articles on why that has become such a hot topic.

Our product Piiker has taken a very different approach at solving the needs of cancer providers and patients. It has put together all the required pieces of puzzle in an innovative manner. This would not have been possible if I had focused more on constraints. Innovation thrives when you abandon the constraints!.

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